About Tina’s Wish

ABOUT TINA BROZMAN

Tina Brozman was only 54 in June 2007 when she died, two years after she was diagnosed – too late – with ovarian cancer. Tina will be remembered as an innovative jurist, a superb lawyer and law partner, and a mentor with a profound influence on the lives of many young professionals. But, ultimately, she was a mother and a wife who was loved and is missed intensely by her family.

At the age of 32, Tina became the youngest judge appointed to the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the Southern District of New York, eventually becoming the chief judge of the court. During her time on the bench Tina had a significant and lasting impact on both domestic and international restructurings. In the 1991 bankruptcy case of the sprawling British company Maxwell Communications Corporation, Tina and her English counterpart, Lord Leonard Hoffmann, developed a protocol for multi-jurisdictional insolvencies that became the template for all complex multinational bankruptcies to follow. The United Nations later predicated its Model Law on cross-border insolvencies upon the Maxwell protocol and, in 2005, the U.S. Congress codified the Model Law as Chapter 15 of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code, one of the most important resources in modern international commerce.

In 2000, Tina retired from the bench to join Bingham McCutchen LLP as a partner and a co-leader of the firm’s financial restructuring group, where she was highly sought after not only as a skilled advocate but also as a mediator known for her ability to forge consensus out of antipathy. Named one of the 50 Most Influential Women Lawyers in America by The National Law Journal, Tina was unanimously selected by the UJA-Federation of New York’s Bankruptcy and Reorganization Group in 2007 as the first recipient of the Professor Lawrence P. King Award for her significant contributions to the bankruptcy field.

ABOUT THE FOUNDATION

As she battled ovarian cancer in the last two years of her life, Tina brought her passion, drive and intellect to a new and even more challenging realm: the search for an early and effective screen for ovarian cancer. Tina’s deep commitment to others, her unselfishness and her uncanny knack for leaving every person and every issue she touched better than she found them, live on in the work of The Honorable Tina Brozman Foundation for Ovarian Cancer Research, better known to its supporters and friends simply for the dream it embodies – “Tina’s Wish.” Knowing it was too late to affect her own survival, Tina nevertheless undertook the critical and selfless work of saving the lives of other women by laying the groundwork for the Foundation that bears her name. It is this work that Tina’s Wish has pursued since 2008 and will continue to pursue in her name, in her honor, and in her spirit.

The Tina Brozman Foundation for Ovarian Cancer Research (Tina’s Wish)

Tina’s Wish is dedicated to funding groundbreaking research for the early detection and prevention of ovarian cancer.  Know Early. Know Hope.™  This is our mission.  At Tina’s Wish, we believe that the most effective way to fight ovarian cancer is to diagnose it at its earliest, most curable stage or to prevent it from ever developing. Since 2008, we have made available over $3.5 million in grants and created a collaborative research consortium, bringing together scientists from five world-class institutions that are developing innovative prevention and diagnostic strategies.  Thanks to the support of our loyal donors, we are accelerating the pace of progress towards saving women’s lives.  Together, we can make Tina’s Wish a reality.  

The Tina Brozman Ovarian Cancer Research Consortium

The Tina Brozman Ovarian Cancer Research Consortium brings together scientists from five world-class institutions to advance research into the early detection and prevention of ovarian cancer.   The consortium furthers the aim of Tina’s Wish to promote a coordinated, collaborative approach to scientific discoveries into effective diagnostic techniques and prevention strategies.

In 2013, researchers from all five centers of excellence attended the first annual Tina’s Wish symposium to share scientific results and discuss ideas to set the direction of future research. Significant progress has been made so far in the areas of novel screening techniques, new imaging approaches, mouse models of early cancer development, and immune therapies.  We have set our sights on identifying reliable approaches to prevention, screening and early detection in addition to understanding the earliest changes that allow normal cells to turn into cancer.  Over the next 12 months, we expect to develop integrated studies that take advantage of the combined expertise throughout the consortium.  

Consortium members currently include: Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center, Memorial-Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, University of Pennsylvania Ovarian Cancer Research Center, and Yale School of Medicine/Yale Cancer Center.